Archive for October, 2011

Atlanta GA

Monday, October 24th, 2011

Pride Atlatna

41ST ATLANTA PRIDE FESTIVAL, PIEDMONT PARK, OCTOBER 9 2011,
PEOPLE FROM AROUND THE WORLD GETS TOGETHER AND CELEBRATES FREEDOM. Some citizen do not agree in this demonstrations, specially concervative citizens. LGTB communtiy complaint about that they don’t have the same rights as a straight citizen, LGTB are treated as a second class citizens. I decide to capture every single moment of the parade. Well you decide!
take a look of all the photos that i took.
thank you Nikole and Karin

THE SKY CRIES.

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

© Olivier Morin/AFP

i love this pic where shortly after that it crossed the target line, Kjersti from Norway.

WE HAVE TO BE FAST!

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

HERE IS THE CLIP WHERE MR MATTOS HITS THE REFEREE, IT WAS A VERY FAST KICK, SO TOOK A FRACTION OF THE SECOND TO SHOOT THAT GREAT PIC

Sports Photography can be a witness.

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

MATT DUNHAM.

THE CUBAN TAEKWONDO FIGHTER VALODIA MATTOS ATTACK THE REFEREE.

high_key

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

High-key lighting is a style of lighting for film, television, or photography that aims to reduce the lighting ratio present in the scene. This was originally done partly for technological reasons, since early film and television did not deal well with high contrast ratios, but now is used to suggest an upbeat mood. It is often used in sitcoms and comedies. High-key lighting is usually quite homogeneous and free from dark shadows. The terminology comes from the key light (main light).
In the 1950s and 1960s, high-key lighting was achieved through multiple light sources lighting a scene—usually using three fixtures per person (left, right, and central) —which resulted in a uniform lighting pattern with very little modeling. Nowadays, multiple hot light sources are substituted by much more efficient fluorescent soft lights which provide a similar effect.
The advantage to high-key lighting is that it doesn’t require adjustment for each scene which allows the production to complete the shooting in hours instead of days. The primary drawback is that high-key lighting fails to add meaning or drama by lighting certain parts more prominently than others.
Most recently, shows with bigger budgets moved away from high-key lighting by using lighting set-ups different from the standard three-point lighting. Part of the reason for this is the advent of new lighting fixtures which are easier to use and quicker to set up. Another reason is the growing sophistication of the audience for TV programs and the need to differentiate.
The term “high-key” has found its way from cinema into more widespread usage, for example referring to an event that requires much organization or is subject to a great deal of publicity

low_key_Lou.

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

 

 

Low-key lighting is a style of lighting for photography, film or television. It is a necessary element in creating a chiaroscuro effect. Traditional photographic lighting, three-point lighting uses a key light, a fill light, and a back light for illumination. Low-key lighting often uses only one key light, optionally controlled with a fill light or a simple reflector.
Low key light accentuates the contours of an object by throwing areas into shade while a fill light or reflector may illuminate the shadow areas to control contrast. The relative strength of key-to-fill, known as the lighting ratio, can be measured using a light meter. Low key lighting has a higher lighting ratio, e.g. 8:1, than high-key lighting, which can approach 1:1.
The term “low key” is used in cinematography to refer to any scene with a high lighting ratio, especially if there is a predominance of shadowy areas. It tends to heighten the sense of alienation felt by the viewer, hence is commonly used in film noir and horror genres.